Consoldating student loans

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Under certain circumstances, federally backed student loans – such as Direct Subsidized Loans and Federal Perkins Loans – can be discharged or forgiven.The prospect of your student debt evaporating may seem like a dream come true.WARNING: It is very dangerous to consolidate federal loans into a private consolidation loan.You will lose your rights under the federal loan programs once you choose to consolidate with a private lender.In reality, though, not that many people end up being eligible.Requirements vary depending on the type of loan, but most offer forgiveness for those employed in certain public-service occupations. You can consolidate all, just some, or even just one of your student loans.Consolidating federal student loans may be a good strategy to lower monthly payments or to get out of default, but it is not always a good idea.

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Under the Direct Loan Consolidation Program, you can consolidate Subsidized and Unsubsidized Stafford Loans, Supplemental Loans for Students (SLSs), Federally Insured Student Loans (FISLs), PLUS Loans, Direct Loans, Perkins Loans, Health Education Assistance Loans (HEALs), and just about any other type of federal student loan.

Let’s look at an example of getting a federal consolidation loan—you can also get a private consolidation loan if you have private loans, but we’ll get to that in a minute. Fifteen thousand dollars in subsidized loans with a 3.5% interest rate, and then two different unsubsidized loans: a loan of ,000 with a 4% interest rate, and a loan of ,000 with a five percent interest rate.

[Show example, with interest rates.] If you’re not sure about the differences between unsubsidized and subsidized loans, we cover this in another video.

Over 10 years, you’ll pay about ,000 in interest on your original principal of ,000. Under your new loan terms, your loans will be consolidated into one ,000 loan—and you’ll have one new fixed interest rate, which is determined by taking the weighted average of the interest rates on your previous loans, and rounding up to the nearest one-eighth of one percent. Now, entering your loan information into a loan consolidation calculator, you’ll find that consolidating your loans gives you a new repayment period, which is figured based on the amount you owe – the more you owe, the longer this repayment period will be.

It can vary from 10 to 30 years, but in this case it’s going to be 25 years. That’s a lot less than the 0 a month you would have spent on a standard 10-year repayment plan.

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